Proposed Changes to the Provincial Policy Statement

View of Falls on Mississippi River from Glass Street on July 22, 2019

On July 22, 2019, the provincial government announced proposed changes to the Provincial Policy Statement, called the PPS for short. This Statement sets the policy for all planning and land management policies below it, like the County of Lanark Official Plan and the Mississippi Mills Official Plan.

In 2017 and 2018, a number of meetings of concerned residents were held on the Natural Heritage Systems portion of the proposed Official Plan, while other changes went unnoticed.

This week the province is seeking input on proposed changes. The announcement of general changes can be found here:

https://ero.ontario.ca/notice/019-0279

The lengthier review (72 pages) citing the changes more specifically can be found here:

https://prod-environmental-registry.s3.amazonaws.com/2019-07/EN_PPS%20Proposed%20Policies_July2019.pdf

The comment period is open from July 22, 2019 to October 21, 2019 (91 days). Thank you to our Director of Planning, Nicole Dwyer, for providing notice of this announcement to all council last night.

Taxes and Finances

Without a history of regular financial reports to Council from the municipal administration and departments, it is hard to say how taxes will go.  The debt is currently about $4 million more than the $18 million that the ex-mayor claimed it would be at the end of 2018.

Council said that the reserves would be built up so much by 2018 that we could borrow from ourselves. The mayor wrote “…if Public Works needs $300,000 for a new piece of heavy equipment, the money comes from reserves.” However, at their last regular meeting, the 2014-2018 Council voted to borrow nearly another million dollars to buy a grader, a fire truck and other equipment. When asked by a councillor if reserves could fund it instead, the staff response was “no.” Reserves have  dropped below what they were supposed to have been at this point.

Where did things go wrong? Well, mismanaged projects and programs  headed and directed by council have cost far more than expected; in the worst case, the Pakenham library renovation project alone was approximately 100% over its budget (final figures have not been reported at this writing). On some projects, milestone and cost updates were so late that potential corrections could not help. A few projects came in so much under budget that the costing process seemed odd.

Most big-ticket projects were managed by small groups of councillors who made the spending decisions; the ill-fated library renovation and Gemmill Park projects are examples. Meanwhile, little investment of time in real public consultation was made in the Official Plan review and ill-fated park sales proposals. How much time and money were spent on ideas like paving the recreational trail for the imaginary hundreds who “commute” (when no funds were allocated – or likely – for upkeep)? Development charges earmarked for Almonte growth were spent elsewhere. The downtown infrastructure replacement project seemed to have been dropped except for end-phase benches. The result of the lack of public consultation and poor decision-making is that the Municipality has  incurred far too much in legal costs. Is there a contingent liability fund to pay for these mistakes? Or did it  cost us some basic services?

The Long Term Financial Plan apparently did not account for things like the ever-rising costs of energy, interest rates, salaries, benefits and shaky management. Residential property taxes and sky-high development charges can no longer remain the only sources of revenue.

I would like to see taxes as low as possible. With so little fiscal information in the face of some obvious misadventures, it will be a challenge. I think that a fiscally prudent back-to-basics approach will be required.

How Did They Vote?

I prepared a document that lists how the current council voted on a number of issues over the past term.

On some matters, the votes teetered back and forth, although the same group seemed to vote as a block on certain things.

Significant flips include:

Council at first were all leaning  to remove the 7B Bridge as recommended by staff, but then ultimately voted to save it and widen it to 7 metres, after hearing from farmers. Only Councillor McCubbin held out against it.

Councillor Torrance consistently voted against the sale of Don Maynard Park in Mississippi Mills, but changed her mind and voted to dispose of it at County.

Councillor Lowry voted for questionable Almonte ATV by-passes for  the Ottawa Valley Recreational Trail, but voted against the final one through the intersection of Martin and Ottawa Streets that was suggested in June 2018.

Browse through the list here: Council Voting