Cost Sharing Response to Mayor

On her Facebook page, Mayor Lowry raised some issues with my motion on the Recreation and Culture Cost Sharing with Carleton Place.

Mayor Lowry used the amounts only up to 2019 to show that we have given Carleton Place just under a million dollars: $925,069.00. I used more recent numbers up to the amount already approved for 2020 ($149,832), totalling $1,074,901.00 (the amount the Treasurer estimated for 2021 is $154,330 by the way).

Our numbers are both from the same source: the Mississippi Mills Treasurer. This table below is what the Treasurer sent to the Library Board earlier this year, as the Board prepared its budget proposal for 2021. I used these numbers for my chart assuming them to be correct, but with an estimate for 2021. The amounts that I used that are prior to 2016 came from previous budget documents.

2021 Proposed Cost Sharing Budget

The increase of “approximately $50,000″

The increase of “approximately $50,000″ that I referenced is the difference between Carleton Place’s 2021 request for $154,330 and the 2016 amount of $104,650.50. The difference is exactly $49,679.50. I rounded. If you use different parameters, you will get different numbers.

Basis for Cost Assessment

Right now, whatever Mississippi Mills pays is calculated using the higher property values (residential and commercial) in the areas around Carleton Place. The 2016 dwelling value average for that part of Mississippi Mills was $399,150, while the average value across Mississippi Mills was $380,403. The results are therefore skewed in favour of Carleton Place. With average 2015 household incomes of $121,608 and $128,968 in the two dissemination areas border Carleton Place, compared to $97,795 in Mississippi Mills generally, one could argue that these residents can afford a levy or increased user fees instead of passing the costs for this agreement to all of Mississippi Mills.

The Mayor noted some subdivisions around Carleton Place. She omitted those that “abut” Almonte’s “boundary seamlessly” such as Greystone Estates and Munro Meadows. Many Almonte residents do go to Carleton Place for all kinds of things, particularly grocery shopping, where there is more competition. But we do have a library and an arena. The most additional distance any “South Ramsay” resident would have to travel to Almonte’s library in preference to Carleton Place’s would be about 11 km, and most of the north half of South Ramsay residents are actually closer to Almonte.

Fear Factor

Mayor Lowry’s post insinuates legal action by Carleton Place (“Beyond being unneighbourly, Council may find there are legal ramifications to permanent decisions made without consulting the other two municipal parties”) and suggests there may be a withdrawal of the automatic aid fire services from Mississippi Mills, in vindictive retaliation I suppose. Not a worthy argument and not a comparable agreement.

I don’t believe that a court would rule that a municipal council has no authority or control over its own expenditures and that another municipality can stipulate via a formula unrelated to usage what it pays for residents to access facilities, forever. There is no exit clause, but there is no binding stipulation.

Contrary to her assertion, Council did have at least one opportunity to hear Howard Allan explain the cost sharing agreement: at our briefing and training in early 2019. Some of us also attended the first cost sharing meeting of this term, where Mr Allan went into more detail about the calculations. The previous Council also voiced its concerns to the parties in 2016.

Benefits and Costs

The benefit that Mayor Lowry ascribes to the 1419 residents of the two dissemination areas would amount to $106 per resident (using the 2019 amount of $149,832 divided by 1419) or about $272-$287 per household. Remember that while this is a special amount paid only because of these residents, it comes out of Mississippi Mills revenues. No other part of the municipality benefits in this way. Note that the Howard Allan agreement also includes the assessment of commercial properties.

The property assessments for residents of Greystone Estates are included in the calculation see the map below to give an idea of how far it extends: right up to Almonte (reference: Howard Allan Agreement Addendum of November 2000, page 12).

Almonte has sewer and water services that are not subsidized by ratepayers outside Almonte, and only service users pay for it. If the same approach was taken, Ramsay residents could continue to subsidize Carleton Place by using the Howard Allan method to pay for their preference of facilities via a levy without burdening the rest of the municipality. I would caution them to read the Howard Allan agreement first. Note that if you live just outside Almonte and are closer to Almonte recreation, we are assessed at 50%-60% on your behalf, the same as if you lived just outside Carleton Place. Commercial and farm properties add to the amount.

All of Mississippi Mills is assessed for a share of the pool, because:

“In terms of swimming pool services we have estimated the contribution rate to be 25% of the Town of Mississippi Mill’s (sic) weighted assessment. The reason for this is that swimming pool services should be available to all Mississippi Mills residents and therefore we feel that the scope of the participating assessment should not be limited to Ramsay Ward, as in the other two service areas.”

- Howard Allan Agreement Review November 2000, page 13

As noted, some people, including myself, have used the pool in Carleton Place. Other residents use pools in Arnprior, Ottawa and Perth. Only the Carleton Place pool is subsidized. Almonte and Ramsay also paid into its construction.

What would happen if we terminate?

It is important to remember that the resident location/property assessment issue is used only to determine what Mississippi Mills pays, not who pays. Then this cost is added to the budget and tax bill for all residents.

If Mississippi Mills terminates its agreement to pay, then all Mississippi Mills ratepayers, including the affected Ramsay residents, would see the money they have paid either eliminated or redirected towards Mississippi reserves or other items. Council needs to discuss this.

Carleton Place will then need to charge non-resident user fees and maybe higher fees to cover their costs. They will need to manage their own facilities at 100% if Beckwith also withdraws. Carleton Place residents may face a tax increase to cover their own facilities. If Mississippi residents prefer to continue the agreement, then an additional levy should be charged to ratepayers in the Howard Allan affected areas. The property values and household incomes in that area suggest that those residents “adjacent” to Carleton Place may be better able to afford such a levy.

It may be that Carleton Place might ban any users from their facilities, like Smiths Falls did recently to residents of Merrickville-Wolford who refused to pay Smiths Falls a share under a Howard Allan agreement. This is like “cutting off your nose to spite your face” in that the facility owner loses these revenues and it is nearly impossible to determine in the case of leagues or organizations.

The motion to terminate the Agreement cannot be unexpected to Carleton Place. The previous council gave notice in 2016 that it was unhappy with the agreement. Measures were taken then to try to bring the library “cost-sharing” into compliance with the law. Neither the former Library Board or the former council can irrevocably bind the present board and council. The agreement itself calls for review and admits its problems with subjectivity and lack of precedent. I am sure that Carleton Place council and residents would be sorry to see an end to the subsidy of their facilities. They would then be in our situation.

Mayor Lowry suggested that the first step should be to talk to Cost Sharing Committee. The mayor and CAO did that in 2016 and their request was defeated by that committee.

The way to bring up the issue is to make a motion and debate the merits. This keeps expenditure authority in our hands and does not delegate it to third parties to make our decisions. The service delivery review also raised a number of serious issues related to cost sharing and I will comment on those in another post. However, the mayor claimed that “Cost Sharing Agreement represents 4.1% of this total.” Actually, as verified by the Treasurer’s budget “pie” and the latest service delivery review, cost sharing is 4% of the Recreation budget and 8% of the Library budget:

2020 Recreation Budget Pie Cost sharing 4%- source : Treasurer
2020 Library Budget Pie cost sharing 8%- source: Treasurer

I encourage you to read the Howard Allan report and review for yourself, and look at the history. The rising property assessments on which this agreement is based escalate our costs in times like this, on depreciating facilities that have not even been open lately.

The bottom line in my opinion is that it does not make sense for residents to pay for the costs of a third library and a third arena when we have two of each of these facilities in the Municipality, and multiple choices for swimming beyond our borders. The costs of recreational choices should be borne by the chooser.

See Councillors Dalgity and Maydan at the Almonte Library on Oct 5, 2019 10 – noon

Bring us your comments and concerns to see if we can help.

Recent Council items: “Downtown Renewal”, safer crossings on Ottawa and Paterson Streets, lowering Golden Line Road speed limits to consistency with the City of Ottawa and residents’ wishes and more. What are your views?

Crossing Guards and School Patrols

School patrols help children cross safely on less busy streets.

The safety of children on their way to school has been raised by many people in Tait McKenzie, Holy Name of Mary and Naismith schools neighbourhoods. Several people there have told me that traffic is more congested in front of the schools because some parents, whose children are within walking distance of the school, drive the kids to avoid an unsafe street crossing at Ottawa Street.

In some cities and towns, school routes are patrolled by the “school patrol,” older students who have been trained to help younger ones cross intersections safely. Their training is provided as a joint project by the province and the Canadian Automobile Association, in cooperation with schools. Paid or volunteer adult crossing guards are used on major streets. Parents are more willing to let their children use active transportation to school (walking or cycling or scooting) if there are crossing guards and school patrols.

You can read more about the Manitoba program here (search for “crossing guard” or “school patrol”):
https://www.gov.mb.ca/mit/traffic/pdf/school_area_guidelines.pdf

Some people say that the municipal paid crossing guard program in Almonte was discontinued because it was thought too expensive. Some say no one wanted to do it. Some say the schools should look after it. There are suggestions that the high school students might do it for their volunteer experience. There are kindly retirees in Almonte who might volunteer, too. I think that we can all work together on this.

There are 40 school weeks. In Almonte, a crossing guard is most needed on busy Ottawa Street at Paterson, for elementary school children. To pay one crossing guard $15 per hour, for two hours a day, 5 days a week, for 40 weeks would cost $6,000. Two guards would cost $12,000. Additional insurance might be required. School patrols, who are older students who do not control traffic but rather ensure that children cross safely, could be stationed at less busy intersections on the routes. They are usually let out of school a bit early, given high-visibility vests and flags and work with a volunteer staff person or parent. People have suggested that high school students perform this function as part of their volunteer hours.

I have communicated with both School Trustees and Councillor Dalgity. We are arranging a meeting to discuss this in January. We need to have safer school routes.

Mill Run Subdivision Information

While I was visiting the Mill Run neighbourhood, a number of people asked me about the status of two neighbourhood features. As a candidate, I was allowed to obtain information from the Municipality. Here are my questions and the responses I received:

New Road Question: Please provide a detailed update on the progress of the road and public works going in behind Honeybourne Street from Paterson.

Answer from Town Staff: “Menzie Street is being constructed by the developer of the subdivision and being cost shared with the Municipality.  The works are well underway and expected to be completed by the end of October.”

New Park Question: Please provide a detailed update on the development of the 4-acre Park on one side of Horton at the end of Laroche Street.

Answer from Town Staff: “At this stage Council has approved the concept plan for the Mill Run park but no detailed designs have been completed. The goal in 2019 is to complete the detail design for the park as well as try and have some of the construction completed.”

Jan’s Comments: The “concept plan” was prepared quite a while ago.  Many more people have moved into Mill Run since then, and their views must be considered on a refreshed “detail design” for their park.  If you have thoughts on this, I would appreciate hearing from you.

Other Concerns:

I heard from about a dozen households that traffic control is still a concern. A four-way stop was suggested at the intersection of Sadler and Honeybourne and a three-way stop at Honeybourne and Maude. Several residents  complained of noisy stunt driving, often at night, behind the businesses along Ottawa Street.  A reduced speed limit of 40 km  in residential sections and by schools was also requested.

Residents on the side of Ottawa Street from Mill Run down to to Martin Street want better and safer pedestrian crossings, especially for school children, who must cross Ottawa Street to get to one of the two elementary schools on Paterson. People reported that parents drove their children to school because they think that crossing Ottawa Street is unsafe, especially at the Sadler intersection. I have written a separate post about crossing guards and school patrols.

A few people talked about the pond in the park, how it may be used and if it might breed mosquitoes; they wondered if aerating it in some way might prevent that. There are issues with ponds: do they function as  retention for run-off? Will they provide a degree of filtration for water destined eventually for the river (wetland); will weeds or algae be harvested, pests controlled etc. That should be something to be discussed at a public meeting on the park addressing the concerns.

Mill Run is a “Friendly Town” neighbourhood, with so many people who know each other. Thank you for your warm welcome!